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The World of Pocahontas

The 400th anniversary of Pocahontas's capture, marriage, and voyage to England provides an unparalleled opportunity to explore cultural interactions between Indians and English settlers in the emerging Atlantic World of the early seventeenth century. During the next year, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation and Preservation Virginia, in collaboration with the Pamunkey Indian Museum and Cultural Center and the Patawomeck Heritage Foundation, will host a series of public programs, lectures, and an exhibit focused on the life and marriage of Pocahontas at Historic Jamestowne.

On April 5, 2014, visitors will have a unique opportunity to experience Pocahontas's marriage to Englishman John Rolfe at the original site where the wedding took place. In 2010, archaeologists uncovered the location of the 1608 church in James Fort, the site of the1614 marriage. In addition to the commemoration of the marriage, visitors will have a number of opportunities to participate in eyewitness living history programs, lectures, and tours beginning in October 2013 and extending through the summer of 2014.

World of Pocahontas Schedule

EVENTS
These programs will take place at Historic Jamestowne and are free with paid admission to the site, unless otherwise indicated. They are generously supported by James City County (VA), with additional sponsorship from the Virginia Tourism Corporation and the Virginia Lottery.

"A gentleman of approved behavior"
Saturday, March 29, 2014 12:00 and 2:00 p.m.
Join Martha Sizemore, housekeeper to Rev. Alexander Whitaker, as she shares the recent occurrences in her master's household. Reverend Whitaker took an interest in Pocahontas's spirituality, ministering to and eventually baptizing her. Martha has watched as Pocahontas has slowly grown more accepting of English ways, wearing English clothes, and even taking the English name "Rebecca." Now "Rebecca" is to marry the widower John Rolfe!


Pocahontas's wedding FAQ

"Pocahontas, John Rolfe, and a Pretty Chapel: A Wedding at Jamestown"
Thursday, April 3, 2014 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.
Bill Warder, NPS Interpretive Park Ranger, will discuss the historical evidence for the April 5, 1614 wedding at Jamestown. The rediscovery of the 1610 church site by the Jamestown Rediscovery archaeologists in 2010, along with primary source documentation, provides confirmation for a James Fort wedding.

"a thing acceptable to Powhatan"
Thursday, April 3, 2014 1:00 and 3:00 p.m.
It is April 3, 1614 as you join Edward Brewster, the captain of the guard at James Fort, as he meets with two of Pocahontas's "brothers," Aquinton and Keyghaughton, emissaries of Chief Powhatan, to discuss the pending marriage of Pocahontas and John Rolfe. Pocahontas has recently returned from a visit to Powhatan's village where the English took her to show her father that "his daughter was very well and kindly treated." Two of her brothers were "much rejoiced" and have promised to persuade their father to "conclude a firm peace forever." Perhaps these representatives can agree to terms of peace during the wedding.

Pocahontas and Rolfe: Old Worlds and New Worlds
Thursday, April 3, 2014 5:30 p.m.
Historian and author Daniel Richter will explore how expanding our definitions of "old" and "new" worlds can enhance our understanding of early seventeenth-century cultural encounters. It has often been said the marriage of Pocahontas and John Rolfe united people from the Old World and the New. But which was which? For Pocahontas, presumably, America was the old world and England was the new one. And for both Pocahontas and Rolfe, rapid social changes were reshaping familiar ways of life, making each of their old worlds new. Richter is the Richard S. Dunn Director of the McNeil Center for Early American Studies and Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of American History at the University of Pennsylvania. He is author of Before the Revolution: America's Ancient Pasts (Harvard University Press, 2011), which was named by the Wall Street Journal as one of the ten best non-fiction books of 2011; Facing East from Indian Country: A Native History of Early America (Harvard University Press, 2001), which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History and won the 2001-02 Louis Gottschalk Prize in Eighteenth-Century History; and The Ordeal of the Longhouse: The Peoples of the Iroquois League in the Era of European Colonization (University of North Carolina Press, 1992).

General admission tickets for this lecture are $6 for adults and free for students (ID required for entry and admittance is subject to space availability). For tickets, call 1-800-HISTORY.

"Love and Marriage in the Time of Pocahontas"
Friday, April 4, 2014 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.
Bly Straube, Senior Archaeological Curator for Jamestown Rediscovery, will examine early 17th-century wedding customs practiced by the English and by the Virginia Indians. Artifacts reflective of the "labyrinth of love" from James Fort and other 17th-century Virginia sites will also be discussed.

"to give her in the church"
Friday, April 4, 2014 1:00 and 3:00 p.m.
Join Reverend Alexander Whitaker as he discusses tomorrow's wedding of John Rolfe to Pocahontas with two of Pocahontas's "brothers," Aquinton and Keyghaughton, emissaries of Chief Powhatan. Whitaker arrived in Virginia in 1611 and was in the colony last year when Captain Samuel Argall captured Pocahontas and brought her to Jamestown. Whitaker has since taken an interest in her spirituality and well-being, and has made efforts to spread Christianity to the Native population. His hope is that the conversion and marriage of Pocahontas will bring peace and good fortune to Jamestown.

An Evening to Honor John Rolfe & Pocahontas
Friday, April 4, 2014, 6:30 pm
The Colony Room , Williamsburg Lodge
310 South England Street, Williamsburg, VA
Join us for a celebration supper on the eve of the most famous wedding in American history! It's April 4, 1614, and the Reverend Alexander Whitaker has invited you to dine. Pocahontas has been living with the English for nearly a year and has since taken to English ways and adopted the Christian faith. Now she is to be married to the Englishman John Rolfe. In honor of this happy occasion, and with the Reverend's hope that this marriage will establish a lasting peace with the Powhatan people, he has invited two of Pocahontas's brothers, several prominent colonists, and You to celebrate.

This special evening will begin with cocktails at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner at 7 p.m. The menu will feature both English and Native American foods prepared with a modern twist. The price for this special evening is $95.00 per person, which includes dinner, dessert and coffee and tea service. An optional cash bar will be available. Tickets are on sale now through Monday, March 31 at 8 p.m. For tickets, call 1-800-HISTORY or click here to purchase online.

Proceeds from this dinner will support the World of Pocahontas Initiative, a series of public programs, lectures and an exhibit commemorating the 400th anniversary of the 1614 marriage of Pocahontas to Englishman John Rolfe at Historic Jamestowne. The World of Pocahontas Initiative is presented by The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation and Preservation Virginia, in collaboration with the Pamunkey Indian Museum and Cultural Center and the Patawomeck Heritage Foundation. Special appreciation is extended to Donald and Elaine Bogus for their generous support of this evening's celebration.

The Marriage of Pocahontas
Saturday, April 5, 2014 10:30 a.m., 1:00 p.m., and 3:30 p.m.
Be an eyewitness to the marriage of Pocahontas to Englishman John Rolfe at the original church site where the 1614 wedding took place. In 2010, archaeologists uncovered the location of the 1608 church where the marriage took place. Visitors can also participate in a series of eyewitness living history programs, lectures, and tours throughout the day. These programs explore the politics, culture, beliefs, and material world of the region's indigenous peoples and English newcomers. Preservation Virginia and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in collaboration with the Pamunkey Indian Museum and Cultural Center and the Patawomeck Heritage Foundation will host the commemoration.

"Pocahontas, John Rolfe, and a Pretty Chapel: A Wedding at Jamestown"
Sunday, April 6, 2014 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.
Bill Warder, NPS Interpretive Park Ranger, will discuss the historical evidence for the April 5, 1614 wedding at Jamestown. The rediscovery of the 1610 church site by the Jamestown Rediscovery archaeologists in 2010, along with primary source documentation, provides confirmation for a James Fort wedding.

"done about the fifth of April"
Sunday, April 6, 2014 1:00 and 3:00 p.m.
Join Martha Sizemore, housekeeper to Rev. Alexander Whitaker, as she shares her thoughts on the recent marriage of John Rolfe to Pocahontas. It has been a year since Captain Samuel Argall lured Pocahontas onto his boat and brought her to Jamestown. As a ward of the colony, Reverend Whitaker took an interest in Pocahontas's spirituality, ministering to and eventually baptizing her. Martha watched as Pocahontas slowly grew more accepting of English ways, wearing English clothes, taking the English name "Rebecca" and then marrying the widower John Rolfe. Martha will share many of the conversations she has overheard.
__________________________________________________________

"no reason why the Collonie should not thrive"
Saturday, April 12, 2014 12:00 and 2:00 p.m.
The April 5 marriage of Pocahontas to John Rolfe was to establish a lasting peace between the Native peoples of Virginia and the colonists. Join Edward Brewster, the captain of the guard at James Fort as he meets with two of Pocahontas's "brothers," Aquinton and Keyghaughton, emissaries of Chief Powhatan, to discuss what must be done to maintain the current peace.

"our established friendship with the Naturals"
Thursday, April 17, 2014 10:30 a.m. and 1:00 and 3:00 p.m.
The April 5 marriage of Pocahontas to John Rolfe established a peace between the Native peoples of Virginia and the colonists. Meet Captain Argall as he relates his role in the events that brought about this peace. Argall is an experienced sea captain who in 1613 lured Pocahontas onto his ship and brought her to Jamestown. Argall had hoped to ransom Pocahontas but the negotiations failed, and Pocahontas adopted many of the ways of the English, falling in love with John Rolfe and marrying him.

"done about the fifth of April"
Friday, April 18, 2014 10:30 a.m. and 1:00 and 3:00 p.m.
Join Martha Sizemore, housekeeper to Rev. Alexander Whitaker, as she shares her thoughts on the recent marriage of John Rolfe to Pocahontas. It has been a year since Captain Samuel Argall lured Pocahontas onto his boat and brought her to Jamestown. As a ward of the colony, Reverend Whitaker took an interest in Pocahontas's spirituality, ministering to and eventually baptizing her. Martha watched as Pocahontas slowly grew more accepting of English ways, wearing English clothes, taking the English name "Rebecca" and then marrying the widower John Rolfe. Martha will share many of the conversations she has overheard.

"A True Discourse of Virginia"
Saturday, April 26, 2014 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m.
Meet Ralph Hamor, secretary of the Virginia colony in 1614, as he offers his observations on the current condition of the settlement. Hamor will relate events such as his terrifying sail across the Atlantic in 1609, actions to rebuild the colony following the "starving time," and the capture of Pocahontas and her conversion to Christianity and the capture, baptizing and marriage of Pocahontas to colonist John Rolfe. Hamor will offer an inside look into the leadership struggles at Jamestown and recent English attempts to stabilize their fragile foothold in America. This event is part of a series of public programs highlighting the World of Pocahontas, a special year-long commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the marriage of Pocahontas to Englishman John Rolfe. This program is generously supported by James City County (VA).

Jamestown Day: World of Pocahontas
Saturday, May 10, 2014 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Participate in a variety of interpretive programs and demonstrations marking the anniversary of the 1607 founding of America's first permanent English colony at Historic Jamestowne and Jamestown Settlement. Learn about the experiences of Virginia Indians and Jamestown colonists during this day-long event featuring walking tours, living history demonstrations, historic trades, archaeology site talks, muster demonstrations, and children's activities. "Jamestown Day" features Historic Jamestowne's ongoing archaeological discoveries of the 1607 fort and one of Jamestown Settlement's re-created ships sailing in the James River during this jointly-sponsored event.

LECTURE SERIES
Join scholars and community representatives to explore the politics, culture, beliefs, and material world of the region's indigenous peoples and English newcomers in the seventeenth century and the legacy left by these early interactions. All lectures will be held at the Hennage Auditorium in the DeWitt Wallace Decorative Arts Museum at Colonial Williamsburg. *Admission charged.

From the Hill of Priestly Divination to the Place of the Antler Wearers: An Archaeological History of the Algonquian Chesapeake
Thursday, March 13, 2014 5:30 p.m.
Anthropologist and author Martin Gallivan offers an alternative perspective on the history and culture of the Powhatan and other Native societies in the Chesapeake. When the Virginia Company established Jamestown in 1607, the colonists settled amidst the Algonquian-speaking Indians of the Powhatan chiefdom. Beginning with Jamestown's settlement, the history and culture of the Powhatan and other Native societies in the Chesapeake has been framed largely by colonists' documents produced for European audiences. Gallivan's presentation offers an alternative perspective on this history that draws from recent archaeological discoveries and from collaborative research with contemporary Native communities. The primary goal is to shift the frame of reference from English accounts of the colonial era toward a longer narrative history of Tidewater Algonquians' construction of places and communities from A.D. 200 to the 1600s. In this shift, archaeology serves as a method for developing a history of cultural landscapes and a basis for reassessing colonial accounts. Gallivan teaches at the College of William & Mary where he is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology. This lecture draws from Professor Gallivan's forthcoming book From Tsenacomacoh to Powhatan: An Archaeological History of the Algonquian Chesapeake.

General admission tickets for this lecture are $6 for adults and free for students (ID required for entry and admittance is subject to space availability). For tickets, call 1-800-HISTORY.

Pocahontas and Rolfe: Old Worlds and New Worlds
Thursday, April 3 2014 5:30 p.m.
Historian and author Daniel Richter will explore how expanding our definitions of "old" and "new" worlds can enhance our understanding of early seventeenth-century cultural encounters. It has often been said the marriage of Pocahontas and John Rolfe united people from the Old World and the New. But which was which? For Pocahontas, presumably, America was the old world and England was the new one. And for both Pocahontas and Rolfe, rapid social changes were reshaping familiar ways of life, making each of their old worlds new. Richter is the Richard S. Dunn Director of the McNeil Center for Early American Studies and Roy F. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of American History at the University of Pennsylvania. He is author of Before the Revolution: America's Ancient Pasts (Harvard University Press, 2011), which was named by the Wall Street Journal as one of the ten best non-fiction books of 2011; Facing East from Indian Country: A Native History of Early America (Harvard University Press, 2001), which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History and won the 2001-02 Louis Gottschalk Prize in Eighteenth-Century History; and The Ordeal of the Longhouse: The Peoples of the Iroquois League in the Era of European Colonization (University of North Carolina Press, 1992).

General admission tickets for this lecture are $6 for adults and free for students (ID required for entry and admittance is subject to space availability). For tickets, call 1-800-HISTORY.

EXHIBIT
World of Pocahontas Exhibit Opening
June 2014 Voorhees Archaearium
Archaeological finds that have reshaped our understanding of the lifeways of Chesapeake's Indian peoples will be highlighted in a new exhibit at the Voorhees Archaearium, the archaeological museum at Historic Jamestowne. This exhibit will reveal new details about the material world of Virginia's Native peoples and their adaptation and interaction with the English settlers.

HIGHLIGHTS
Hostage, Diplomat, Spy: Children and War in Pocahontas's World
An Oct. 10, 2013, lecture by historian and author Jim Rice discussed two young people who were vital emissaries between Jamestown's English settlers and the Powhatan Indian leadership in the first years of contact. Rice described the lives of Pocahontas and an English boy named Henry Spelman in the first lecture of the "World of Pocahontas" commemoration. http://www.historicjamestowne.org/wofp/pdf/Jim_Rice_Lecture.pdf

The Indigenous Chesapeake: Past and Present
An Oct. 24, 2013, roundtable discussion of Pamunkey and Patawomeck community members explored the material culture and historical life ways of the Tidewater Algonquians. Members of Pocahontas's descendant communities discussed her story and provided a perspective on Virginia's contemporary tribes, traditional culture and plans for the future. http://www.historicjamestowne.org/wofp/pdf/Virginia_Indian_Roundtable.pdf

The Challenge of the Young Woman Pocahontas
On January 18, 2014, about 100 people saw Kerry McClure portray Martha Sizemore, housekeeper to Rev. Alexander Whitaker at Henricus, as part of the "The World of Pocahontas" yearlong commemoration of the meeting of English and Powhatan cultures. It was one of many "Eyewitness" events that feature actor interpreters, presentations by Indian specialists, and demonstrations of historic trades to allow visitors to explore the politics, culture, and material world of the region's indigenous peoples and English newcomers. Click here for the full story.


World of Pocahontas Events

The World of Pocahontas Timeline Childhood Meeting the English Marriage Ambassador to England

The World of Pocahontas Sponsors
Timeline of Events
List of Early Settlers

Featured Tours
In the Trenches
In the Trenches Curator's Artifact Tour
Curator's Artifact Tour

Jane, The Book and Video

Jamestown: The Buried Truth

America in 1607: Jamestown and the Powhatan

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